September 27, 2019

Mercy Medical Center receives 11th consecutive EPA ENERGY STAR certification

For the 11th consecutive year, Mercy Medical Center has again been awarded the U.S. EPA’s ENERGY STAR certification—one of only three hospitals in the United States, and the only one in Ohio, to earn this designation.

Each year the hospital’s main campus, a facility of 1 million square feet that’s a blend of old and new construction, saves nearly $1 million in energy costs. On average, ENERGY STAR-certified buildings and plants use 35 percent less energy, cause 35 percent fewer greenhouse gas emissions, and are less expensive to operate—all without sacrifices in performance or comfort. Hospitals that earn EPA’s ENERGY STAR certification, on average, save $3,000 per bed annually on energy costs.

“We continue to see the long-term benefits of Mercy’s long-standing stainability practices, not only in monetary savings, but also in being a champion for the principles of good stewardship,” said Tom Strauss, Mercy’s interim CEO. “As Stark County’s only faith-based hospital, Mercy has a responsibility to the communities we serve to honor our mission, make the best use of our resources, and care for the environment we share with all those around us.”

Last year the Ohio Hospital Association (OHA) presented Mercy with a resolution honoring the hospital for its environmental leadership and accomplishments, including its emergence as a leading institution around energy efficiency. In 2012, Mercy received the OHA’s John Chapman Award, which recognizes a hospital or health system that has demonstrated leadership in guiding their facility toward the goals of environmental sustainability, regulatory compliance, energy efficiency, and pollution prevention. Mercy has also received the OHA’s Melvin Creeley Award for environmental excellence multiple times, as well as the Ohio EPA’s Encouraging Environmental Excellence Award.

In addition to standard “green” building practices, each renovation or new construction Mercy undertakes includes the following environmentally conscious strategies:

  • Sunshades, which keep out the direct rays of the sun, lowering the need for additional cooling.
  • LED lighting, the most efficient way to light.
  • Air curtains, which keep the heat where it is most needed.
  • Skylights, which provide as much natural light as possible so that fewer lights are needed.
  • Occupancy sensors, which automatically turn off lights when rooms are not in use.

Nick Bagnolo, vice president of construction and facilities for the Sisters of Charity Health System, commends all those involved in helping Mercy continue this long-standing achievement, including plant engineering staff, hospital administration, Siemens Building Technologies, architects, engineers, American Electric Power, and Abbott Electric.

He said, “Sustainability is an attitude and a culture. Caring for the environment has become part of what Mercy stands for in the community.”

ENERGY STAR-certified buildings and plants are verified to perform in the top 25 percent of buildings nationwide, based on weather-normalized source energy use that takes into account occupancy, hours of operation, and other key metrics. ENERGY STAR is the only energy efficiency certification in the United States that is based on actual, verified energy performance.

For more information about Mercy’s conservation efforts, visit cantonmercy.org/green.

 

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