February 28, 2013

Nashville Songwriters in the Round April 12 event to Benefit Healthy Learners

The third Nashville Songwriters in the Round event benefiting Healthy Learners is April 12 at 6:30 p.m. at the Prince George Ocean Commons, in Pawleys, Island, South Carolina. In the spirit of Nashville and the famous Bluebird Cafe, songwriters share their songs written for many of country’s music stars and the stories behind them. [More]
February 18, 2013

South Carolina Center for Fathers and Families featured in “Catholic Health World” newspaper

The South Carolina Center for Fathers and Families and its Nurse Practitioner Dawn Pender are featured in the February 15 edition of Catholic Health World. The article highlights the center’s mission and the work Pender does as she helps medically underserved men receive proper healthcare. [More]
February 7, 2013

Healthy Insights from Healthy Learners

Healthy Learners continues to make great progress in connecting South Carolina children to care so that poor health is not an obstacle to doing well in school. Read more about Healthy Learners in the latest issue of the "Healthy Insights from Healthy Learners" newsletter. [More]
January 14, 2013

Voting now open for the Center for Fathers and Families to win $100,000 in the Infiniti Coaches' Charity Challenge

University of South Carolina Men’s Basketball Coach Frank Martin is representing the South Carolina Center for Fathers and Families, a ministry of the Sisters of Charity Health System, for a chance to win $100,000 for the center! Please take a moment to visit espn.com/infiniti. The center needs a minimum of 1,000 votes PER DAY for Coach Martin as he competes with 47 other rival coaches and their charities. Voting ends February 27. Your vote counts! Please vote every day! Fathers matter. The South Carolina Center for Fathers and Families helps fathers overcome challenges and become actively involved in their children’s lives. Fathers care deeply about their children, but need the help of a program like the Center to help them strengthen their roles as fathers financially and emotionally. When fathers are involved in their children’s lives the families and communities win. About the Infiniti Coaches’ Charity Challenge: The Infiniti Coaches’ Charity Challenge is an online competition between 48 head men’s college basketball coaches across the nation. Each coach represents a charity of their choice and competes against one another for online votes with the hopes of winning $100,000 for their charity. The coaches are separated into four regions South, East, Midwest and West. You are allowed to vote for one coach in each region once per day. After six weeks the coaches’ with the most votes from each region move onto the final four. Please help us in getting Coach Martin to the final four and ultimately winning the grand prize for our ministry, the South Carolina Center for Fathers and Families. Please share this message and encourage others to vote for Coach Martin and the South Carolina Center for Fathers and Families. Also, be sure to “like” the Center on their facebook page and follow them on twitter (@SCFathers) to track the progress of the challenge.
January 11, 2013

Cast your vote for the South Carolina Center for Fathers and Families in the NCAA Coaches’ Charity Challenge

University of South Carolina Men's Basketball Coach, Frank Martin, is competing in the 3rd annual ESPN Infiniti Coaches' Charity Challenge. He's competing for online votes to win $100,000 for the South Carolina Center for Fathers and Families. [More]
January 4, 2013

Building Healthy Communities' healthy cooking classes for teens featured in Plain Dealer

Building Healthy Communities, which supports and empowers Cleveland residents to address quality of life concerns, is currently providing free cooking classes to moms, teens and children in the city’s Central and Kinsman neighborhoods. Developed to support healthy eating habits and teach ways to prepare healthy meals and snacks, the classes typically run Tuesday afternoons for four weeks. Recently, The Plain Dealer featured a Building Healthy Communities Teen Chef Class in an article, which also includes a video interview with Building Healthy Communities Director Sharon Glaspie. [More]
December 14, 2012

Latest "Joseph’s Journey" newsletter details how Joseph’s Home transforms the lives of homeless men one man at a time

Mr. H. is typically a soft-spoken, mild-mannered person. But, ask him about his time at Joseph’s Home and he becomes much more animated as he describes the care he received. “All the Joseph’s Home staff, especially Ms. Jackson [Executive Director Georgette Jackson], have supported me all the time,” explained Mr. H. “It relieved my mind knowing I could be somewhere safe, clean and secure. I am very appreciative.” After years of struggling with diabetes and congestive heart failure, plus undergoing dialysis due to kidney failure and being hospitalized regularly, Mr. H. was unable to work and eventually became homeless. He stayed at a homeless shelter for more than a month, but the shelter could not provide the specialized medical care he needed. He was referred to Joseph’s Home and admitted in August 2011. Joseph’s Home provided Mr. H. with the medical attention he needed, ensuring he took his medications and received regular dialysis. He also received anger management counseling, life skills classes and nutrition education. When his car was repossessed due to an administrative problem with his payments, Joseph’s Home social worker Rodney Dial helped him resolve the issue and get the vehicle back. Being at Joseph’s Home also allowed Mr. H. to try new things. Some of them—like attending his first Cavs basketball game thanks to a generous donor’s contribution of tickets—were a big hit. The art program was a slightly different story. For his first and only masterpiece, he tried his hand at painting a picture of a pumpkin. Although he enjoyed the experience, the painting didn’t turn out well. When asked about it, he laughed and said, “I can’t paint a lick.” But, he did receive a certificate for giving it his best shot. He said the encouragement from others was inspiring. Mr. H. was hospitalized again in January to repair a detached retina in his eye. After four months away from Joseph’s Home, he was re-admitted. Mr. H.’s health stabilized and he was approved for an apartment. He moved into his new home in late July, with a nurse visiting regularly to provide medical attention to keep his health stable. With the help of Joseph’s Home, he can look forward to fewer days in the hospital and a longer, healthier life. Click here to find out more about Joseph’s Home in the latest edition of the “Joseph’s Journey” newsletter. Joseph’s Home is a ministry of the Sisters of Charity Health System.
November 28, 2012

Joseph’s Home featured in The Plain Dealer’s Holiday Spirit Campaign

For the second year in a row, Joseph’s Home was selected as one of several nonprofit groups to receive funds from Plain Dealer Charities’ Holiday Spirit Campaign. The designation includes a $10,000 gift to support programs and services for residents. Plus, a former Joseph’s Home resident is featured in a Holiday Spirit story, which was published today in The Plain Dealer. Joseph’s Home is a ministry of the Sisters of Charity Health System. Following is the text from The Plain Dealer article: John Hall was driven by crack and cocaine—so driven, he lost his wife, children and job. Hall, 51, of Cleveland, said the murder of his father, curiosity and the influences of the streets had led him to drugs. He said he hoped the drugs would take away his pain. "I had a lot of problems, mentally and emotionally," he said. "I lost myself. I didn't know who I was." But Hall said pride prevented him from receiving help from his family, so instead he slept in parks and abandoned homes. And even when his reckless lifestyle led to four stints in prison, he didn't change his attitude. "I felt that there was no chance for me, that life was over for me," he said. In November 2011, Hall got into an argument with another man, who then got into his car and rammed it into Hall several times, pinning him between a parked car. Once his attacker sped away, Hall tried to get up, but it was impossible because his right foot was turned in the opposite direction, the heel of his foot now where his toes should have been. He passed out. A good Samaritan took him to MetroHealth Medical Center that night, but he had to wait two weeks before having surgery. His sister then tried to find him a place to stay while he recovered. Joseph’s Home meets a housing needThat's when Hall's sister found out about Joseph's Home. Joseph's Home is one of only two agencies in the state that provide transitional housing for homeless men who are suffering from acute medical conditions. Joseph's Home also helps residents find jobs, housing and other programs to help improve their lives. Joseph's Home is one of among 20 human-service agencies featured in Holiday Spirit, an annual effort by Plain Dealer Charities to help human-services agencies during the holiday season. To make a secure donation to this year's campaign, go to cleveland.com/holidayspirit. Hall had to make some changes: Joseph's Home requires residents to take part in a number of programs such as life-skills classes, chemical dependency programs and money management. Hall went further, however, enrolling in anger management, basic computer classes and intensive outpatient and after-care programs. He will start working toward earning a high-school equivalency degree in January. Hall shares his story with youths at the Cudell Recreation Center and packaged and served food on Thanksgiving at St. Augustine Church. Hall, who has been sober for a year, is grateful for the love and support of his mother and sister. He also credits the staff of Joseph's Home for changing his life. "These are the miracles God put in my path to have me be where I'm at today. I love where I am today," he said. "I have my own apartment, I'm looking for a job and I'm going back to school. Life has gotten good for me. I'm a miracle." Georgette Jackson, executive director of Joseph's Home, beams with pride when she talks about Hall. "I'm so proud of him," she said. "He wanted to succeed so badly. He wanted to change and make good choices." Pictured is Joseph’s Home alumnus John Hall, who has been sober for a year. He credits the staff of Joseph’s Home for changing his life. He now has his own apartment, is looking for work and will start working to get his GED in January. Behind him are pictures painted by Joseph’s Home residents.
November 21, 2012

South Carolina Center for Fathers and Families executive director participates in launch of national fatherhood initiative

The Center for Urban Families formally launched the National Practitioners' Leadership Institute (NPLI) at an October event at its headquarters in Baltimore, with Pat Littlejohn, executive director of the South Carolina Center for Fathers and Families, participating as part of a panel discussion at the launch event. NPLI is a national cohort-based initiative designed to improve outcomes for low-income fathers and families by strengthening the capacity of organizations and government agencies working in the responsible fatherhood and family strengthening. The launch introduced the first cohort of NPLI’s Leadership Academy and included remarks by Joshua DuBois, director of White House Office of Faith Based Neighborhood Partnership, among others. The NPLI works to promote the larger development and forward advancement of the human services field by fostering diverse venues for peer learning while establishing a broadened network of grassroots organizations dedicated to strengthening families and to providing quality services in responsible fatherhood, workforce development, and healthy relationship and marriage. The South Carolina Center for Fathers and Families is a ministry of the Sisters of Charity Health System. Pictured is Pat Littlejohn (middle) on the discussion panel at the launch of the National Practitioners' Leadership Institute.
November 19, 2012

South Carolina Center for Fathers and Families’ impact reaches across the state

The South Carolina Center for Fathers and Families and its local affiliated programs are making an impact across South Carolina. Below are highlights from a few of those local programs: A Father's Place receives $19,400 jobs grantThe Frances P. Bunnelle Foundation recently awarded a grant of $19,400 to A Father's Place to support a job coach and related job development activities. The job coach will coordinate the Job Boot Camp, which is a weeklong intensive job readiness training offered once a month, and work with fathers to help find employment and arrange transportation. “Helping fathers find a job that pays a living wage is a critical step in rebuilding men's lives and reestablishing relationships with their children" said Wallace Evans, executive director, A Father's Place. "With this grant we are one step closer to our goals.” Midlands Fatherhood Coalition participates in town hall meetingMidlands Fatherhood Coalition joined WIS-TV and Parenting Solo October 20 in Columbia, South Carolina, for a town hall style meeting called "Disappearing Dads: Rebuilding the Family." The meeting discussed the recurring theme of fatherless homes and the impact it has on children. Charles Brown, Midlands Fatherhood Coalition assistant director, and Ron Hilton, regional job developer, served on the panel to discuss the importance of fatherhood and how the Midlands Fatherhood Coalition works to reconnect fathers with their families. Pictured after the meeting are (left to right) Charles Brown, Ron Hilton, actor Michael Jai White, Pat Littlejohn, Jimmie Whaley. Man 2 Man helps fathers become job readyMan 2 Man has put 51 fathers through a weeklong Job Boot Camp and introduced them to its job readiness/job skills training component throughout the year. Program participants received employment certification and/or job training in a number of areas, such as national forklift certification, construction labor & OSHA certification, heavy equipment operations and GED training. By gaining job skills training and certification, these fathers are more qualified for jobs so they can provide for their children and take one step closer to a stable life. The South Carolina Center for Fathers and Families is a ministry of the Sisters of Charity Health System.

About Us

From its Cleveland headquarters, the Sisters of Charity Health System provides oversight, leadership and strategic direction to more than 20 organizations responding to community needs in Canton and Cleveland, Ohio, and South Carolina.

Follow us on Twitter

Archives