November 12, 2012

Mercy Medical Center opens new Mercy Primary Care at St. Paul Square health care facility on site of former church

Mercy Medical Center opened its newest health care facility today in northeast Canton, Ohio, in a former convent on the site of St. Paul’s Catholic Church, which closed in 2011 when it merged with another parish. Mercy Primary Care at St. Paul Square provides family medicine and dental services to a medically underserved area. In addition, Community Services of Stark County, Inc. will be offering behavioral health services at the new facility. “After listening to the people express their needs and working in collaboration with various community agencies and organizations, we determined that bringing comprehensive care to this neighborhood was simply the right thing to do,” said Sister Carolyn Capuano, HM, vice president of Mission and Ministry at Mercy Medical Center. Canton’s northeast area is home to more than a quarter of the city’s population, yet it previously had no health care providers. The Canton Repository ran an article on November 3 about the new facility and the impact it will have on health care in the community, and how it helps fill a void left after the church closed. Mercy also believes its new facility will provide quality, convenient health care services to employees at organizations in the surrounding community. Programs will be instituted to support healthy living, prevention, early detection, treatment and navigation through the system of care. “The establishment of Mercy Primary Care at St. Paul Square allows us to provide accessible and affordable health services to this community and further carry out the hospital’s longstanding mission,” said Thomas E. Cecconi, president and CEO at Mercy Medical Center. Mercy Medical Center at St. Paul Square is based on the characteristics and principles of a medical home model. The medical home model is a best practice approach to address the health care needs of urban communities and is recognized for promoting health equity and increasing health care access.
November 9, 2012

Mercy Medical Center honors ICU nurse Lito Espinosa as a star performer employee

Mercy Medical Center named Lito Espinosa, a registered nurse in the intensive care unit (ICU), Mercy’s Star Performer employee for September. The Star Performer program is the hospital’s employee recognition and rewards program. Hospital employees, volunteers and staff are nominated each month for demonstrating outstanding performance, being a team player, going above and beyond, being creative and innovative, and championing service excellence. Espinosa was nominated for showing extreme compassion and caring for his patients and their family members, including those patients with life-threatening situations.  Co-workers in Mercy’s ICU are very impressed with his dedication and exemplary patient care. Espinosa was presented the award by Mercy President and CEO Thomas E. Cecconi, ICU Clinical Nurse Manager Christina Ashcraft and Human Resources Manager Charity Davis. Mercy Medical Center is a ministry of the Sisters of Charity Health System. Pictured left to right are: Thomas E. Cecconi, president and CEO of Mercy Medical Center, Christina Ashcraft, clinical nurse manager, Lito Espinosa and Charity Davis, human resources manager.
November 6, 2012

Judge Kenneth Rocco and Joseph Maurer join Regina Health Center Board of Directors

Regina Health Center, a high-quality provider of compassionate and holistic health care services for religious and lay people needing short-term rehabilitation, assisted living, respite care or residential nursing care, has appointed Judge Kenneth A. Rocco and Joseph C. Maurer, CPA, to its board of directors. [More]
November 5, 2012

Mercy Medical Center unveils new video highlighting its rich history and ongoing mission

Dedication to excellence. Devotion to healing. Mercy Medical Center has championed both since the Sisters of Charity of St. Augustine opened the hospital September 12, 1908, in Canton, Ohio, in the former home of President William McKinley. Mercy was Stark County’s first and only Catholic hospital, and was open to everyone, rich and poor alike, regardless of religious faith or nationality. A new video highlights Mercy Medical Center’s rich history, starting in 1851 when the Sisters of Charity of St. Augustine came to Cleveland from France and then Stark County in 1883, and eventually opening a hospital in 1908 in downtown Canton. It was due to the generosity of Mrs. Rosa Klorer that the Sisters were called to Canton to establish a Catholic hospital. Mrs. Rosa Klorer purchased the McKinley home at Market and 8th Street Northwest in Canton and deeded its use as a hospital. The Sisters converted the McKinley home into an 18-bed hospital named Mercy in honor of Our Lady of Mercy. Mercy eventually expanded three times to meet the needs of a growing community. In 1950, W. Robert and Henry H. Timken gave the Sisters the H.H. Timken residence along with 30 acres of land. Timken Mercy Hospital opened in 1952 as a 68-bed satellite to Mercy Hospital. Building additions in 1953, 1957 and 1970 at Timken Mercy led to the closing of the old Mercy Hospital in 1970, with all services being consolidated at the Timken Mercy campus. The Stark County District Library now stands on the old Mercy Hospital site. Timken Mercy Hospital became Timken Mercy Medical Center in 1979 to reflect its expanded role in community health care beyond traditional hospital services. The video also highlights Mercy’s ongoing mission to continue Christ’s healing ministry by providing quality, compassionate, accessible and affordable care for the whole person, as well as some of the challenges facing Mercy Medical Center and the importance of keeping employees and physicians educated in the traditions and commitments of Catholic health care. Mercy Medical Center is a ministry of the Sisters of Charity Health System. Today, Mercy has 476 beds, 620 members on its medical staff, and employs 2,500 people. Mercy continues to serve as Stark County's only Catholic hospital. To view the video, click on the links above or click here.
November 2, 2012

Healthy Learners 13th annual fundraising golf tournament is a big hit

Now in its 13th year, the annual Healthy Learners Champions for Children Golf Tournament in Memory of George Younginer continues to be the largest fundraiser for Healthy Learners. Thanks to 139 golfers, 34 volunteers and many generous sponsors, the October 17 golf outing at Fort Jackson Golf Club in Columbia, South Carolina, netted more than $86,000 for helping children access needed health care. The event featured a great day of golf, food, prizes and more, plus a golf driving demonstration by two-time World Long Drive Champion David Mobley. The tournament was presented by AFLAC and had dozens of additional sponsors. "Each year, proceeds from the golf tournament enable us to help hundreds of children all across South Carolina by providing them with health care services like vision care, dental care, and hearing evaluations," said Jo Pauling-Jones, executive director of Healthy Learners. We are grateful to our supporters and the community for investing in the health and future of the children." Healthy Learners, a ministry of the Sisters of Charity Health System, is devoted to removing children’s health barriers to learning with love and compassion. Pictured is one of several children from Healthy Learners who attended the event and interacted with golfers.
November 1, 2012

2012 Harvest Ball raises $270,000 to renovate Mercy’s Department of Emergency Medicine

Mercy Service League held its 2012 Harvest Ball on Saturday, October 27 in the Canton Memorial Civic Center’s McKinley Room. The event raised nearly $270,000 to benefit Mercy Emergency Department’s renovation and expansion project. [More]
October 31, 2012

Building Healthy Communities offers free cooking classes for children, teens and moms

Building Healthy Communities hosts free four-week cooking classes for children, teens and moms in Cleveland’s Central and Kinsman neighborhoods to teach healthy eating habits, and how to prepare healthy meals and snacks. Twenty children recently completed Jr. Chef classes taught by Sharon Glaspie, director of Building Healthy Communities, at the new CornUcopia Place kitchen in Cleveland’s Kinsman neighborhood. The Jr. Chef classes, which Glaspie taught with the help of three members of the Garden Boyz, featured lessons on whole grains and high antioxidant foods. Jr. Chef students learned how to make muffins, pumpkin smoothies, turkey burgers and Halloween apple teeth using high antioxidant Red Delicious apples. “It’s important to reach children at an early age because healthy eating habits learned early in life help form the basis for developing a healthy adult lifestyle,” said Glaspie. Mom Chef classes begin Tuesday, November 6 at CornUcopia Place, where Glaspie will teach mothers how to prepare healthy meals that their children will enjoy. The free classes will run for four weeks every Tuesday from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Contact Julia DiBaggio at 216-341-1455 to reserve a spot in the class or for more information. CornUcopia Place is a community space providing nutrition education, cooking demonstrations, an open event space to be shared with the neighborhood, and a harvest preparation facility for use by local market gardeners. Jr. Chef, Teen Chef and Mom Chef classes are also held on Mondays at Arbor Park Village in Cleveland’s Central neighborhood. Building Healthy Communities is a ministry of the Sisters of Charity Health System. Pictured are participants in a recent Jr. Chef class, learning to make healthy whole grain muffins.
October 29, 2012

Providence Hospitals and Sisters of Charity Foundation of South Carolina award $10,000 to Free Medical Clinic of Columbia

Providence Hospitals and the Sisters of Charity Foundation of South Carolina partnered to provide the Free Medical Clinic of Columbia in Columbia, South Carolina, with a $10,000 award. The Free Medical Clinic of Columbia provides health care at no cost to individuals and families who cannot pay for services and without health insurance. It also provides medications, diabetic supplies and patient education. George Zara, president and CEO of Providence Hospitals, said, “Providence is honored to present the Free Medical Clinic of Columbia with this grant along with our Sister ministry, the Sisters of Charity Foundation of South Carolina. The clinic’s dedication to Columbia’s underserved residents is true to the spirit of our hospitals’ mission, which is to extend the healing ministry of Jesus Christ to God’s people.” “The foundation’s vision is for families in this state to have the resources to live out of poverty, and access to health care is often a determining factor,” said Tom Keith, president of the Sisters of Charity Foundation of South Carolina. “The Free Medical Clinic serves families residing around both the hospital and foundation and this funding will help strengthen and support their work as they serve those in our community.” The Sisters of Charity Foundation of South Carolina and Providence Hospitals are ministries of the Sisters of Charity Health System. Pictured: Tom Keith, president of the Sisters of Charity Foundation of South Carolina, (left) and George Zara, president and CEO of Providence Hospitals (right) present Dennis Coker, executive director of the The Columbia Free Medical Clinic, (middle) with a check for $10,000.
October 26, 2012

Cleveland Central Promise Neighborhood ambassador receives Most Treasured Volunteer Award

Promise Ambassador and founder of Men & Women of Central Jerome Baker was recently honored as a Most Treasured Volunteer by The Center for Community Solutions. Promise Ambassador Lillie Hunter received a commendation from the center. The Sisters of Charity Foundation of Cleveland nominated the two for their outstanding and unselfish work in Cleveland's Central Neighborhood. [More]
October 14, 2012

Division of Child Support Enforcement partners with South Carolina Center for Fathers and Families on $2 million grant

The Federal Office of Child Support Enforcement recently awarded the South Carolina Department of Social Services (DSS) Division of Child Support Enforcement (CSE) more than $2 million in a five-year grant to increase access to services for non-custodial parents who are behind in child support. The increased access will help non-custodial parents to consistently meet their child support obligations and provide for the financial wellbeing of their children. South Carolina was one of eight states to receive such a grant. The Center for Fathers and Families will be a major partner with the CSE on this project to help ensure that non-custodial parents are linked to employment opportunities, fatherhood programs and other community-based services. "With this grant we will bring ‘new eyes’ to the process and institutions involved with the fathers who owe child support," said Larry McKeown, CSE director. "We want to re-engineer business practices to make them more inclusive of fathers and their needs, such as ‘right sizing orders’ for child support and changing circumstances over time that affect ability to pay." Non-custodial parents will receive enhanced child support services, including help with modifying child support orders if necessary, possible reductions in child support debt owed to the state in return for consistent child support payments and finding alternatives to incarceration for enforcement; employment-oriented services that include job readiness, job placement and retention services; and responsible fatherhood/parenting activities using peer support. The project will help redefine the way child support cases are processed, and the way workforce and fatherhood services are delivered to low-income, non-custodial parents by making services more accessible and easier to navigate. The project will be launched in Bennettsville County, and the cities of Greenville, Conway/Georgetown and North Charleston. The SC Center for Fathers and Families and CSE have partnered on a number of projects over the years, including a planning grant that led to this grant, a project to help increase paternity establishment at the time a child is born, and to improve the pro se process for the modification of child support, including a new on-line interactive software and training video that is under development to help individuals navigate this process. Most notable has been the successful collaboration between CSE, the center and the family court to implement Jobs Not Jail, an alternative to incarceration for non-payment of child support. Jobs Not Jail has resulted in significant collection of child support that otherwise would not have been collected if non-custodial parents had been incarcerated. Equally as important, Jobs Not Jail has helped thousands of non-custodial parents find jobs, become responsible fathers and be involved in their children's lives. This new project will build upon this model that has been in place for more than a decade. The South Carolina Center for Fathers and Families is a ministry of the Sisters of Charity Health System.

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From its Cleveland headquarters, the Sisters of Charity Health System provides oversight, leadership and strategic direction to more than 20 organizations responding to community needs in Canton and Cleveland, Ohio, and South Carolina.

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